Why do Spurs have a cockerel?

Tottenham Hotspur have sported a cockerel on the club crest since the 1921 FA Cup final.

The history of the cockerel is similar to the history of the Spurs nickname in regards to the fact that they both began with Harry Hotspur. Henry Percy, who was better known as Sir Harry Hotspur, was a member of the Northumberland family who owned the land in the Tottenham area. The club is said to be named after him. Hotspur got his nickname because he wore spurs on his boots which he would dig into his horse to make it run quicker. He was similarly a fan of fighting cocks, which he also equipped with spurs. These can be seen on the current badge of the club.

The Cockerel dates back almost as long as the Club itself

The cockerel has become synonymous with Spurs, not just because of the badge, but because of the bronze cast cockerel that towered above White Hart Lane on the roof of the West Stand. This, in fact, dates back to 1909, when former footballer William James Scott made this statue for the club to present. The cockerel has been a chief component of Tottenham’s identity ever since.